Earth


I love nature. I love the Earth. I love this planet. Everyday, I wake up thankful for this beautiful world God has given us.

#Rugged.

A post shared by Melissa Bulao (@milaiski) on

(Nacpan Beach, El Nido, Palawan, Philippines)

 

Everyday, I  ask myself what have we ever done to deserve this place.

You were so hard to reach but deym, to call you beautiful is an understatement!!

A post shared by Melissa Bulao (@milaiski) on

(Hulugan Falls, Laguna, Philippines)

 

And everyday, I hope that mankind will collectively ensure that future generations will still have the same kind of earth to enjoy.

Speechless. 😍

A post shared by Melissa Bulao (@milaiski) on

(Sagada, Philippines)

 

This post is in an entry to the DailyPost photography challenge Earth .

New Year and Philippine Waterfalls


It might be too late to greet everyone a “Happy New Year”, but hey a happy new year to you! 🙂 How was your new year? Mine was pretty uneventful. I spent it in my hometown in Bicol, waited for the clock to strike 12 on the the 31st of December, then I slept. Even my blog was uneventful. For the first time, I did not write a year-end post.

Anyway, to start this blog’s year and to lessen my travel diary backlogs, I thought of sharing some of the waterfalls I’ve been to in the Philippines. The Philippines is not only blessed with beautiful beaches but with bodies of freshwater such as lakes, waterfalls and rivers. It’s a good  idea to check these out and include them in your must-visit list this 2016:

  1. Hagimit Falls 
Gentle slopes
Hagimit Falls

Hagitmit Falls is found in the island of Samal in Davao del Norte. One interesting feature of this body of water is that it actually a series of falls. The falls above is just one of the more gently sloping falls. The one below is more “rugged”.

Continue reading “New Year and Philippine Waterfalls”

Enveloped


Hi everyone! How’s your summer (if you’re from the Northern Hemisphere) so far? Mine has been hectic and arid! I’ve been in delulu the past few weeks which pretty much explains my absence in the blogosphere. I turned a year older (yes, I’m now 26!), entertained a bunch of foreigners for a week due to an international conference our office is arranging, and completed my requirements for my post graduate diploma degree. Hurray! I am now graduating! Next semester, if I still have the drive, I will now enroll as a Masters Degree-proper student. One more year till that coveted XX X. XXX, MIH.

Anyway, for this week’s theme “enveloped”, I am sharing this interesting rock structure which I came across in one of the islands of El Nido:

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Seems like I’m inside a fossil, enveloped by hollow structures of bones right? 🙂 Check out more entries at Daily Post.

Refreshing


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Wading in a stream.

Walking in the fi

Walking in a field.

Simple life is refreshing.

Check out “Fresh” theme at Daily Post.

Palawan and the Rule of Thirds


Of the basic photography techniques, the “rule of thirds” is my favorite. It’s one, if not, the only technique I bother to familiarize, practice, and painstakingly try to polish. If perfectly executed, it can bring a photo into a whole new dimension.

For this week’s photo challenge, I did not take new photos (when did I, anyway?) but instead share some of my old shots where I tried to employ “rule of thirds”. These photos were taken during a travel to Puerto Princesa, Palawan last December.

One of my stops in the city was a butterfly garden but it was not the butterflies that caught my attention but a dragonfly. I rarely saw dragonflies now in Metro Manila. 😦

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Rarity.

Puerto Prinsesa is known as well for its beaches. I had a chance visit the islands around Honda Bay, one of which is Starfish Island where I took these:

Waiting is the name of the game.
Waiting is the name of the game.
Freed.
Freed.

The “rule of thirds” is a such a joy to practice right? I could probably post tons and tons of practice portfolio. Hah! But for more astounding photos employing the technique, check out Daily Post.

Radial Symmetry


There are several kinds of symmetry, one of which is radial symmetry. Echinoderms a.k.a. sea stars (or the less technically correct term starfish) exhibits this kind of symmetry. Trusty old Merriam-Webster defines such as “the condition of having similar parts regularly arranged around a central axis”.

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Some flowers also have radial symmetry, case in point:

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Imagine if human faces have radial symmetry. Heh!

Check out Symmetries at Daily Post.